Random thought leads to a resolution  

Random thought, we all know, can originate from anywhere and can be about any topic there is. In this case I look briefly at a resolution idea which randomly came to me. It came to me as I wrote a diary entry recently.

It is a simple resolution which we can make at any time. This resolution commits us to use our time and energy, almost solely, to pursue our goals. It also commits us to avoid spending any time or energy responding to persons who speak or act to put obstacles in our path. (The wording of this resolution, we are free to choose according to our preference.)

 A resolution that helps us ignore the distraction others create.

We sometimes reduce or remove our opportunity to achieve our goals without realizing that we are doing so. We do this when we practise activity that is not related to achieving our goals. Sometimes we pay undue attention to those who speak or act ill toward us.

Many of these people aim to distract our attention away from our goals. When we pay them our attention, we waste valuable time and energy that we need to achieve those goals. To the extent that we dissipate our time and energy on such persons, we reduce or remove our opportunity to achieve our goals.

This is a resolution that requires us to adopt only two standards for its problem-free practice. One standard is that we set lofty goals. The other standard is that we pursue those goals in a way that respects the rights and freedoms of others.

We certainly will achieve our goals when we work energetically toward achieving them. We, however, must remember to ignore attempts by others to distract our attention away from those goals. A good resolution of the type mentioned above can assist us in attaining any goal we set out to achieve.

By Edward Fagan

Please find the following post in this blog:

Taking Personal Responsibility

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An original essay written by Edward Fagan 

Drinkers guilt and the pressure to drink  

Drinkers guilt need not be a problem for non-drinkers. Often times, however, drinkers guilt does create a problem for non-drinkers. Some drinkers experience a sense of guilt when they drink in the presence of non-drinkers. Some drinkers use this sense of guilt as a weapon against non-drinkers.

Teetotalers who politely refuse alcohol from persons who drink sometimes experience this problem. Some drinkers never give up attempting to pressure non drinkers to drink. These drinkers even think that they should force persons who naturally hate alcohol, to drink. They also think that they should force persons who can not handle alcohol to drink.

Drinkers often tell non-drinkers that they could as well drink because they are still going to die. These drinkers never tell themselves that they could as well stop drinking because they are still going to die.

Drinkers guilt, pessimism and problems

The Accident, Is It A Wakeup Call?

According to these drinkers, you could as well take unnecessary and avoidable risks of premature death because death is inevitable.

They think you could as well take unnecessary and avoidable risk of damaging your internal organs. For them, you could as well expose yourself to unnecessary and avoidable impairment of your immune system.

They also see nothing wrong with one’s spending valuable money, time and other resources on costly medical treatment. This medical treatment is only necessary and unavoidable because of health problems caused by drinking.

It seems fitting that some drinkers would always make a reference to death in discussions involving drinking and non-drinking.

It also seems fitting that some non-drinkers would always make a reference to the optimistic and positive aspects of living. They emphasize a sensible and practical life, and the resulting advantages of health and wellness.

These drinking enthusiasts, additionally, assume the right of choice between drinking and non-drinking; but they are usually unwilling to grant that same right of choice to non-drinking, health and wellness enthusiasts.

By Edward Fagan