Love’s a quality and action

Love’s outgoing care and concern for the other person. It is both an abstract noun, and a verb.

We experience the former as an objectively good, joyful inner quality, accompanied by an urge to protect and serve others. This results in our selfless concrete action that helps and gives to others.

This genuine selfless action reveals the presence of love the experience.
Both aspects of love must coexist if love is to be present.

By Edward Fagan

Please see the following post in this blog:

Looking At Love

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‘Health, The Best Bodily State’

This is an original essay written by me. Read the full essay at Edward Fagan Blog website: www.edwardfaganblog.com/wp .

Here’s an extract from that essay:

Health, what we must do to achieve it

The body must become acid free to be disease free. Internal organs especially need biominerals for optimal functioning. (The pancreas needs zinc, the brain needs iron etc.) Those organs absorb and benefit from biominerals only, therefore we need only take such biominerals. Non biominerals or acid based minerals will not work but will contribute to the disease state.

We must use only Alkaline based nutrition to be free of all disease, as only this will work. Acid based nutrition will create and maintain the mucus-forming acid state. This acid state will make the body disease prone and prevent it from reaching the ideal state of health. We must follow an alkaline diet to be free from all diseases.

For further information on this subject, please visit the website mentioned above in this page.
An original essay
by Edward FaganPlease read this original essay I wrote, in the new website of Edward Fagan Blog at:

http://edwardfaganblog.com/wp

The end starts to be less of a problem

The end for Carl? It does not seem so anymore. Carl begins to follow the prescribed course of action, and looks forward to becoming cured of his disease. He also looks forward to experiencing the other positive, life-changing outcomes of following the prescribed course of action.

The end for Carl does not seem to be here for Carl’s doctor either. Doctor Hinkson continues reading the research findings in the fields of biochemistry and its application. He also continues reading the research findings in the field of herbalism for herbs that effectively and completely cure diseases. He remains tireless in his effort to find a cure for Carl’s disease.

The end is much less likely to come now

In his reading as mentioned above, Doctor Hinkson discovers the work of world renown herbalist, the late Dr. Sebi. Dr. Sebi is founder of Dr. Sebi’s Research Institute. He also visits the institute’s website at: www.drsebiscellfood.com. His research finally reaches its destination. He finds what he seeks. Dr. Sebi’s products certainly are going to cure Carl’s disease. Doctor Hinkson shares this awesome discovery with Carl. Carl experiences sheer excitement.

Dr. Sebi’s Research Institute cures all diseases including: AIDS, sickle cell anemia, diabetes and cancers among others. They cured all diseases for the past twenty eight years.

The institute recommends only an alkaline diet. In its treatments, the institute uses only alkaline herbs and herbal compounds. Dr. Sebi replaces the acidic state with the alkaline state. He replenishes the body with the minerals it lost during the acid state. He restores the mucus membrane by removing the mucus caused by the acid state.

Doctor Hinkson wastes no time at all. He places carl on Dr. Sebi’s alkaline diet. (This diet is available at: www.drsebiscellfood.com.) From Dr. Sebi’s Institute, he orders the relevant alkaline herbal compounds. The compounds arrive in two days. Carl starts to take them immediately. His confidence in the compounds is limitless.

‘The End Of Life For A Man Who Has A Secret’ is an original creative essay written by Edward Fagan. Above is an extract from that creative essay.

 

By Edward Fagan

Please also see the following post in this blog: Looking At Love . 

Various ways of expressing love are used where ever there is a need to express love. Where ever love exists it is practised, and where ever it is practised it is expressed. When we express love, we must do so using one or more of the ways of expressing such love.

Humans are called to possess and express love toward each other and toward our beautiful world. Expressing love in the various and creative ways in which it can be expressed is therefore a part of that call. Expressing love is as important as love itself, and is universal and perennial.

Love deserves to be expressed in the most beautiful, artistic and moral way. The esthetic quality of the way we express love in any given situation can never be too high.

Expressing love in a manner that reflects emotional and other forms of affection, warmth and sensitivity can determine the nature and extent of our response to that expression of love. Expressing love in such an appropriate tone and manner can convey a sense of peace, fraternity, joy and happiness.

Expressing love as mentioned above can bring delight to the hearts of recipients of that expression of love who might be suffering through depression, sadness and despair. These recipients of that expression of love can be inspired to: cultivate a positive view of themselves and a more optimistic view of their circumstances and change, correspondingly, their behaviour toward themselves and their circumstances.

Expressing love in the manner mentioned above and our appropriate response to it can have a beneficial effect on the mental and emotional condition of both the person to whom love is expressed and the person expressing love.

The importance of expressing love is reflected in the cultures of the world, all of which have oral, physical and other customs and traditions that evolved from the love for and the importance of, expressing love. These customs and traditions and our own inclinations allow us more scope to express love in a practical way and with all of the joy, beauty and art that expressing love deserves.

The arts offer ample opportunity to identify or create, store, retrieve and teach values and practices relating to love and its expression. The literary arts, the performing arts and the visual arts continue to be used by their practitioners to teach or remind us how we may express love beautifully in all of its facets.

This cultural and artistic contribution to our understanding, practice and expression of love is a commonly shared legacy of all humans; and it provides an easily accessible resource which we can exploit in our effort at expressing love. We, obviously, also have our best natural  and acquired verbal, physical and other abilities which we can use in expressing love. The extent to which and the way we use this commonly-shared cultural and artistic legacy, and our natural and acquired abilities relevant to expressing love can help us greatly  in our effort at expressing love as effectively, richly and artistically as we wish to express it.

by Edward Fagan

An original essay written by Edward Fagan

Training children for living is important for several reasons. These reasons include, to develop in them good and regular habits of behaviour that: contribute to their personal wellness and circumstances, are socially graceful, and are morally just toward others and themselves.

There is also the well known need to train children and assist them in developing such habits of behaviour because their level of immaturity requires that they be correctly guided by others.

(In this essay the parent, guardian and child care-giver are seen as knowing what they intend to pass on, by way of instruction and example, to their children. They are seen also as understanding the relationship between indifference to training children, and, training children in the right way, and the consequences of these two approaches.)

The level of immaturity in children, and their need to be guided by others, fortunately, are not disadvantages. There is always a corresponding willingness and ability in most children to learn from and be guided by adults.

Early childhood is known to be the best years for development of good, as well as bad, regular habits of behaviour. Generally, bad habits of behaviour form where good habits of behaviour are not developed. It is well known what can happen when such bad habits of behaviour are left unchecked during early childhood.

In children, developing correct habits is more immediately important and more likely to be achieved than is understanding the concepts and principles behind the correct habits.

Understanding the concepts and principles behind the correct habits becomes easier as children develop toward adulthood. By late adolescence to early adulthood, these underlying concepts and principles should be understood, and the relationship between good habits of behaviour and these underlying concepts and principles should be seen.

At this stage, the connection between: right action and wrong action on one hand, and their consequences to us and others on the other hand, should also be clearly understood.

Training children draws on several areas of knowledge and practice and is concerned with correctly influencing and shaping the thinking and action of young innocent persons.

Occasionally action has to be taken to prevent undesirable thought and action from becoming firmly rooted in the minds, behaviour and character of some children.

Discipline, simple and appropriate, is used to assist in implanting correct thought and behaviour in place of undesirable thought and behaviour.

Early childhood training and development of good regular habits of behaviour contribute to the building of character and affect how we relate to ourselves, to others as individuals and members of social groups, to institutions of the sovereign state in which we live, and to God.

Parents, guardians and others who are responsible for nurturing children will determine whether or not they participate in the training of those children. They will determine also, if they decide to train those children, what methods of instruction and action they use in their attempt to successfully train those children. It is understood that parental refusal to train children is parental choosing to train them in the wrong way and toward the wrong outcome by default.

By Edward Fagan

 

Observation

This is a regular column of this blog. Its posts are published on Fridays or Wednesdays. In this column, Edward Fagan looks very briefly at certain statements, actions, people or objects. 

A silent teetotaller who politely refuses alcohol from persons who drink often experiences attempts by such persons to pressure him to drink. Drinkers tell him that he is still going to die, whether or not he drinks. It seems fitting that some drinkers would always make a reference to death in discussions involving drinking and non drinking.

It also seems fitting that some non drinkers, when given the opportunity to do so, would always make reference to the positive and optimistic prospects of living a sensible and practical life, and the advantages of health and wellness resulting from such a life to its practitioners.

These drinking enthusiasts, additionally, assume the right of choice between drinking and non drinking; but they are usually unwilling to grant that same right of choice to non drinking, health and wellness enthusiasts.

by Edward Fagan      

 

Briefly

Briefly is a regular column of this blog; its posts are published on Sundays. In this column an original essay or original short story is written by Edward Fagan.

The word “Love”is one of the most cherished and regularly used words in the world, in all languages. It also seems to be one of the least understood and most actively misused words.

We can get a clearer understanding of the meaning and nature of this word so that we might practise love more correctly.

We’ll start with the correct, though different, definition of the word. Love is outgoing care and concern for the other person.  It is necessary to know that love exists through action. We give and receive love through the actions we perform toward each other.

Whenever outgoing care and concern for the other person are practised, this active practical love (the outward expression of the inner quality) will always indicate the presence in us, of love the inner quality.

In terms of language, love is both a verb and an abstract noun. Both love in action, expressed and practical, and love, the inner quality, are spiritually good. Love is a good spiritual quality which can be a permanent trait of our character during every moment of our existence.

When love, the inner quality, is present in us we practise love, the expressed action toward others. When this happens, our outgoing care and concern toward others will aim at helping their person, or their circumstances, or both.

Whenever love is practised, it builds where building is necessary or repairs that which is broken. Love helps, gives to, cherishes, protects, maintains and preserves the other person and their circumstances.

Love never leads to harm or destruction of the other person. It is therefore impossible for someone to truthfully claim that they killed or even harmed their spouse in the name of love.

We experience the presence of love, the good spiritual quality, when we practise it toward others, and when others practise it toward us.

Our response to our experience of the presence of love as givers or recipients may be accompanied by our experiencing a certain emotional state. This may result in the expression of one or another type of emotional behaviour. This happens, for example, in romance and marital situations.

Love is always permanent; emotional experience and expression are temporary, they come and go, they are not love.

They are, in a way, similar to sexual foreplay and sexual intercourse which, even though they are not love, are activities through which a husband and wife can express their love to each other.

There is a course of behaviour that can get in the way and prevent us from practising love. This course of behaviour can be avoided if we uphold certain practices that are opposite to it, in our daily living.

The practices we can uphold in our daily living to prevent behaviour that obstructs the practice of love include:

Honouring our parents, as well as others in authority over us, and our elderly

Avoiding to commit murder, and avoiding to harm the other person physically or otherwise

Practising faithfulness to the other person with whom we have a romantic or marital relationship

Refusing to steal from the other person

Speaking the truth or remaining silent about the other person, instead of telling lies against him or her

Refusing to covet that which belongs to the other person, and refusing to practise envy or jealousy toward him or her.

Love, or outgoing care and concern for the other person, whenever it is practised, always faithfully serves its intended purpose and bears fruit. The practice of love can be the backbone of all human relationships if we would allow this to happen; and it can be of great spiritual and other benefit to individuals and groups alike, wherever and whenever it is practised.

By Edward Fagan

There are occasions when politicians from both parties in a two party system should stand up together for a common cause. One such occasion when this bipartisan approach was necessary was following the striking down of Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in 2013 by the Supreme Court of the United Sates (SCOTUS).

(Section 3 of DOMA is known to relate to such topics as (for federal purposes) government employees insurance benefits, social security survivors’ benefits, bankruptcy, immigration, filing of joint tax returns, scope of laws protecting (heterosexual only) families of federal officers, financial aid eligibility laws, and federal ethics laws applying to heterosexual spouses.)

It is obvious why those seeking to redefine marriage and the family would want to have SCOTUS strike down this section of DOMA.

This bipartisanship was very evident in May 1996 when The Defense Of Marriage Act (DOMA) passed Congress and the Senate by large majorities. This bipartisanship thus contributed to the DOMA being signed into law in September, 1996 by President Bill Clinton.

DOMA defines marriage as the union of one man and one woman. It also defines “spouse” as a partner in a legally recognized heterosexual marriage.

Four out of the nine SCOTUS judges voted in favour of upholding Section 3 of the DOMA. Their position is very noteworthy since clearly, the other five judges misinterpreted part or all of the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment.

All congressmen, senators, governors and mayors, of both parties, who were in favour of upholding the DOMA should have highlighted, locally and nationally, the position of the SCOTUS judges who voted for upholding the DOMA. They then should have considered using the vote of the four SCOTUS judges who also favoured upholding the DOMA, as the rallying cry for their upholding it in practice. This would not only be a case of the ultimate bipartisanship, it would also be a valid case of the end justifying the means.

By Edward Fagan

       

The state of mental health of our politicians, statesmen and other public figures is very important. The need for an optimal standard of mental health among our national leaders can not be over emphasized. This is so given the nature of the decisions they are required to make, and given the nature and extent of the tasks they are required to perform.

This relatively small group of people who run our countries have much of our fate in their hands. In a certain country, the president, about 435 congressmen and about 100 senators together decide the fate of the populace.

The populace of this country exceeds three hundred and twenty million people; and the land area of this country is more than three million square miles. This shows the power and responsibility of our political leaders, and the importance of their being of sound mind.

It used to be the case, since the end of the second World War, that mentally unstable politicians, statesmen and other public figures holding office were mainly to be found in the third world.

Even in the third world, mentally unstable politicians were only expected to hold the reins of power following a military or other coup d’état, or a popular uprising.

Second world countries, perhaps, might be expected to produce the occasional unstable political leader (the former Bosnian Serb leader, Radovan Karadzic, is a good example of this point). Such a despotic leader could never be expected to come from a first world country in the post World War 2 era.

The world thought that it had seen the last of the first world’s mentally unstable politicians, following the demise of Hitler, Mussolini, General Francisco Franco, Stalin and General Hideki Tojo. Leaders of a similar mental state to these were not supposed to hold political office ever again in the first world.

First world countries have been vigilant since 1945 in keeping persons of unstable mind out of high political office. The good reputation earned by the first world countries for civilized behaviour in high political office and other areas of public life, since the end of the second World War, has so far been cherished and well protected.

This situation, however, might be changing soon. There is now a person who seems to be of a very unstable mind seeking election to the highest political office in a prominent first world country. This person is their party’s nominee for the country’s highest political office in the upcoming general election.

This person’s speech and behaviour remind us of the speech and behaviour of the Axis powers leaders during the nineteen thirties and nineteen forties. This person speaks and behaves like a despot, and ignores rules and conventions in their quest for power. This person shows no regard for others, relative to the consequences of this person’s speech and actions.

This person is considered by some medical experts to be mentally unbalanced. Dr. Drew Pinsky, Physician and radio talk show host, told CNN’s Don Lemon that this person seemed to be suffering from multiple mental illnesses.

Maria Konnikova, New Yorker science and psychology writer, writing on the website Big Think, suggested that this person might be suffering from Narcissistic Personality Disorder, NPD.

One expert, Dr. Robert Geffner, President of San Diego’s Institution on Violence, Abuse and Trauma, says there are three aberrant disorders psychologists look for: Narcissistic Personality Disorder, or NPD; impulse control disorder; and anti-social personality disorders. Dr. Geffner says that the presence of these disorders along with bullying, existing in the same person, is a “dangerous and frightening combination”.

What happens if this person is elected to their country’s highest political office? What domestic and foreign policy principles and practices will this person pursue after the general election if they are successful at the poll?

Mentally unstable persons and persons who are, otherwise not mentally well, should not be allowed to contest elections for any level of political office. All applicants to such elections should be required to undergo medical tests to verify their mental health status. Periodic mandatory checks to determine the state of mental health of prospective and actual political leaders should be a necessary requirement during their stay in office. Such checks and testing should be easy to implement. Strict psychological examination of suitable applicants to the Secret Service is standard procedure. This psychological examination can be used as an initial example module for the psychological examinations of our political leaders. The list of persons to be routinely checked should include, the president, the vice president, congressmen, senators, governors and mayors.

By Edward Fagan